Is Honey a Healthy Option for Diabetics?

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In your quest to avoid consuming sugar in your Type 2 diabetic eating plan, you may be wondering what you can use to sweeten your food that is a smarter choice. One such option is honey. You may have read one or two articles mentioning honey is a source of nutrients including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, zinc, selenium, and copper.

Add the fact that because honey is a combination of glucose and fructose, it won’t spike your blood sugar levels as much as pure sugar would, and this may lead you to believe it’s a smart choice.

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Not so fast.

Here are some not so useful facts about the sweet stuff…

1. Honey And Inflammation. First, anyone who consumes honey on a regular basis, especially people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, tend to notice increased levels of C-reactive Protein (CRP). An elevated C-reactive protein level, identified by blood tests is considered to be a non-specific marker for a disease.

Doing anything to increase inflammation in your body is going to leave you putting your health in jeopardy as inflammation is the contributor to a whole number of different diseases including heart disease.

2. Honey And Calories. Second, also remember honey does contain calories. At 64 calories per tablespoon, it will add up quickly if you aren’t careful. If you use just two tablespoons per day every day for one month, this would mean an added one pound of body fat accumulated on your frame. Do this for a year and you’ll be 12 pounds heavier.

Calories still matter…

3. Honey And Blood Sugar. Finally, consuming honey will still increase your blood sugar level. Don’t let yourself fall into the trap just because honey doesn’t increase blood sugar as much as table sugar, you think it’s healthy.

Sure, it’s not as bad as sugar, but it’s not ideal either.

So what can you turn to instead? If a recipe calls for honey, consider fiber syrup. Available at individual health and specialty food stores as well as online, fiber syrup is almost sugar-free, rich in fiber, and will not spike your blood sugar levels. It’s a diabetic’s dream come true, so consider ordering some today if you find yourself wanting to turn to honey on a regular basis.

Living a Type 2 diabetes prevention lifestyle or a lifestyle where you need to control and check your blood sugar levels regularly, does not have to mean giving up everything you love. Having said that, moderation is still the best policy when it comes to sweetening your food. So include fiber syrup in your eating plan with your weight and personal nutrition goals in mind.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn’t in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

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